Economist & Associate Professor of Economics
michael.noel@ttu.edu
+1 (858) 357-3818

Courses Currently Taught at Texas Tech University

Graduate Level (Ph.D.) Courses:

ECO5347 Industrial Organization Theory

The course provides a graduate level introduction to theoretical work in Industrial Organization. It deals with theoretical models of pricing, price discrimination, monopoly power, oligopoly, entry, information, mergers, vertical restraints, and regulation. It assumes familiarity with microeconomic theory and competitive game theory.

ECO5348 Seminar in Empirical Industrial Organization

The course provides a graduate level introduction to econometric work in Industrial Organization. It deals with estimating econometric models of pricing, price discrimination, monopoly power, oligopoly, entry, information, mergers, vertical restraints, and regulation, including reduced form and structural approaches, discrete choice modelling, almost-ideal-demand-systems, and merger simulations. It assumes a familiarity with microeconomic theory, game theory and econometrics.

Undergraduate Courses:

ECO3326 Industrial Organization and Competitive Strategy

The course makes extensive use of game theory to analyze competition and the strategic behavior of firms in imperfectly competitive markets. Topics include pricing strategies, collusive behavior, entry decisions, entry deterrence, advertising, research and development, firm structure and merger activity. Special attention will be given to teaching the skills of economic modeling.

ECO3327 Antitrust Law and Economic Regulation

This course examines the economics of antitrust and economic regulation. The first part explores antitrust laws in the United States and the landmark court decisions that have interpreted them, and discusses them in the context of current economic theory and understanding. Topics include monopoly and oligopoly pricing, price discrimination, price fixing, monopolization, tying and bundling, raising rivals' costs, predatory pricing, mergers, resale price maintenance, exclusive dealing, exclusive territories, and refusals to deal. The second part explores the motivations, costs, benefits, methods, and outcomes of economic regulation, and examines the regulatory experience in a large number of industry case studies.

ECO3325 Special Topics in Applied Economics

This course covers special topics of current and particular interest and is offered time to time.

 

Courses Taught at the University of California San Diego

Graduate Level (Ph.D.) Courses:

ECON234 Industrial Organization

The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It deals with price discrimination, monopoly power, oligopoly, entry, information, discrete choice modelling, mergers, vertical restraints, and other competition topics. It assumes a familiarity with microeconomics theory, game theory and econometrics.

ECON260 Industrial Organization

The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It deals with price discrimination, monopoly power, oligopoly, entry, information, discrete choice modelling, and econometric estimation techniques. It assumes a familiarity with microeconomics theory, game theory and econometrics.

Undergraduate Courses:

ECON105 Industrial Organization and Firm Strategy

This course makes extensive use of game theory to analyze the strategic behavior and interaction of firms in imperfectly competitive markets. Topics include pricing strategies, collusive behavior, entry decisions, entry deterrence, advertising, research and development, firm structure and merger activity. Special attention will be given to teaching the skills of economic modeling.

ECON107 Regulation and Antitrust

This course examines the economics of antitrust and economic regulation. The first part explores antitrust laws in the United States and the landmark court decisions that have interpreted them, and discusses them in the context of current economic theory and understanding. Topics include monopoly and oligopoly pricing, price discrimination, price fixing, monopolization, tying and bundling, raising rivals' costs, predatory pricing, mergers, resale price maintenance, exclusive dealing, exclusive territories, and refusals to deal. The second part explores the motivations, costs, benefits, methods, and outcomes of economic regulation, and examines the regulatory experience in a large number of industry case studies.

ECON100A Intermediate Microeconomics I (Consumer Theory)

This is the first course in the upper division microeconomics sequence. In the sequence, we revisit the supply and demand model from the micro principles course but do so in a more rigorous and mathematical way. The first course in the sequence, 100A, analyzes the demand side. We work through the problem of utility maximization by consumers using optimization techniques from multivariate calculus and ultimately derive a demand curve and its properties. We consider a variety of choice applications and decision making under uncertainty.

ECON100B Intermediate Microeconomics II (Cost and Competition Theory)

This is the second course in the upper division microeconomics sequence. In the sequence, we revisit the supply and demand model from the micro principles course but do so in a more rigorous and mathematical way. The second course in the sequence, 100B, analyzes the cost structure of firms, and then analyzes the paradigm of perfect competition. We work through the problem of cost minimization by firms using optimization techniques from multivariate calculus and ultimately derive a supply curve under perfect competition and its properties. We consider a variety of applications of the model.

ECON100C Intermediate Microeconomics III (Monopoly and Oligopoly Theory)

This is the third and final course in the upper division microeconomics sequence. In the sequence, we revisit the supply and demand model from the micro principles course but do so in a more rigorous and mathematical way. This third course in the sequence, 100C, analyzes the supply side when competition is imperfect. We work through the problems of monopoly and oligopoly using techniques from multivariate calculus. We consider a variety of more advanced applications such as incomplete information, public goods provision, and externalities.

ECON87 Freshman Seminar - Landmark Antitrust Cases in the U.S.

This freshman seminar looks at some major antitrust cases in the U.S. from the early twentieth century up to the present day. Some examples include the Great Vitamin Conspiracy, Microsoft, VISA International, Standard Oil, ALCOA, Leegin, Sharp Electronics, and others.

ECON87 Freshman Seminar - How to Take Risks

This freshman seminar introduces decisionmaking under uncertainty. Concepts include risk evaluation, expected value, expected utility, risk aversion, objective and subjective probablity, insurance, and actuarial science.

Business School (MBA) Course :

MGT405 Microeconomics

This course introduces MBA students to supply and demand economics, pricing strategies, market structure, and managerial decisionmaking with economic data.

 

Courses Taught at M.I.T.

14.01 Microeconomics

This is advanced course in microeconomics, rooted in calculus techniques, and covering the fundamentals of supply and demand, consumer theory, competition theory, monopoly and oligopoly theory, entry, asymmetric information and uncertainty. Equivalent to a master's level course at many other universities.

 

Courses Taught at the University of Toronto

ECO200 Intermediate Microeconomics

This is a full year course in intermediate microeconomics. Topics include supply consumer choice theory, cost functions, perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly, asymmetric information and uncertainty.

ECO206 Intermediate Microeconomics with Calculus

This is a full year course in intermediate microeconomics using calculus. The topics are similar to those in ECO200, but will be more intensive and make extensive of calculus and optimization theory.

ECO305 Industrial Organization and Public Policy

This is a full year course in Industrial Organization, the study of firms' decisionmaking processes, competitive and anti-competitive behaviors, and antitrust consequences of those behaviors. It discusses policymaking in the context of monopolistic and oligopolistic markets, optimal regulation, and antitrust law. Topics include monopoly and oligopoly pricing, price discrimination, price fixing, monopolization, tying and bundling, raising rivals' costs, predatory pricing, mergers, resale price maintenance, exclusive dealing, exclusive territories, refusals to deal, and regulation.

ECO326 Advanced Microeconomics

This is an advanced course in game theory. Topics include static games of complete and incomplete information and dynamic games of complete and incomplete information, the concept of Nash Equilibria, Subgame Perfect Nash Equilibria, and Perfect Bayesian Nash Equilibria.

Interested in Antitrust Economics?

  • Professor Noel's undergraduate courses -- ECO3326 (Industrial Organization and Competitive Strategy) and ECO3327 (Antitrust Law and Economic Regulation) -- are popular and tend to fill to capacity very quickly. Early enrolment is recommended.

Looking for Course Materials?

  • All course syllabi and other course materials are available on the Texas Tech Blackboard portal, blackboard.ttu.edu